Tag Archives: corn

Corn succotash frittata

Corn succotash frittata

First, about the name. I had always understood that succotash was a mixture of corn and lima beans (and dictionaries do too). So when I encountered “corn succotash” describing an accompaniment to an entree on a restaurant menu, my first thought was that this seemed redundant. Succotash includes corn, so why do you need to call a dish corn succotash? When it arrived, another surprise: The corn succotash did not include any lima beans or other shell beans that are sometimes substituted. It did include the corn, of course, along with bacon, spinach, and feta cheese, among other things. It was delicious and served as the inspiration for this frittata. But what about having succotash without the lima beans? I googled for corn succotash recipes and found a variety of dishes, many without beans of any kind, that were described as corn succotash. It seems that this term is used for mixtures of corn with ingredients other than lima beans, with the adjective “corn” added to the succotash to distinguish it from “corn and lima bean” succotash. I still think this is a strange name. But since it is common, I’ll use it here.

As I mentioned, the corn succotash was very tasty. I attempted to recreate it, making it an entree by adding chicken. It came out well, and I’ve made it several times. It occurred to me that the same ingredients, less the chicken, could be included to make a corn succotash frittata. And it was delicious!

Corn succotash frittata

2 strips of bacon, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch pieces
1–1/2 tablespoons chopped onion
3 tablespoons diced red bell pepper
1 small clove garlic, minced
3/4 cup frozen corn, thawed
3/4 cup spinach, chopped
2 tablespoons feta cheese plus more for the top

3 eggs
oil, if needed

Cook the bacon in skillet until crisp. Remove and drain on a paper towel.

Cook the onion and red pepper over medium heat in bacon fat until they start to soften. Add the garlic and cook one more minute. Add the corn and cook for 2 to 3 minutes to cook the corn and combine the flavors. Add the spinach and cook until the spinach is wilted.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan if needed and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the corn mixture, the bacon, and the feta cheese into the eggs. Pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, sprinkle on additional feta cheese and place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

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Corn chowder with sausage

Corn chowder with sausage

I know this is a blog about salads and frittatas. But I made this chowder and the result was so attractive that I had to take a picture and include it here. And it also tastes great and is especially satisfying in colder weather.

This was adapted from a recipe I found for summer corn chowder with cod (and it’s also good made with cod instead of the sausage). For the sausage, I have used Hillshire Farms smoked sausage, both the beef and the turkey. Sometimes I have sliced the sausage quite thin. This time, I did somewhat thicker slices, cut in half.

Be sure to use fresh thyme, and include the full amounts of the bacon, scallions, garlic, and thyme. This soup gets its great taste from the combination of those ingredients.

Corn chowder with sausage

5–6 slices bacon cut in quarter-inch pieces
8 scallions (more if very thin) thinly sliced, white and green parts separated, with lots of the green
1–1/2 teaspoons garlic, minced
2 tablespoons flour
2 cups chicken broth
2 cups milk
2 cups potatoes in half-inch cubes
2 teaspoons fresh thyme, chopped
fresh ground pepper
3/4 pound smoked sausage, sliced
2–1/2 cups frozen corn
1/4 to 3/8 cup cream

Cook bacon until crisp in saucepan to be used for making chowder. Remove with a slotted spoon, leaving bacon fat in pan. Drain on a paper towel.

Over low heat, cook white parts of the scallions for 2 minutes. Then add garlic and cook for one more minute. Add flour and cook for 2 minutes while stirring.

Add chicken broth, milk, potatoes, thyme, and pepper. Bring to the boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 10 minutes. Add sausage, corn, and over half of the bacon, again bring to boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 5 minutes. Add cream and over half of the green parts of the scallions. Simmer for 2 minutes.

Serve, topping with the remaining bacon and green parts of the scallions.

Sausage corn chowder frittata

Sausage corn chowder frittata

I’ll look to all kinds of foods to get inspiration for new salads and frittatas. This frittata was inspired by a soup. I sometimes make a chowder with smoked sausage, corn, and potatoes. It occurred to me that these same ingredients would make a good frittata.

Sausage corn chowder frittata

1/2 cup smoked sausage, cut into small pieces
1/2 cup frozen corn
1/2 cup potatoes, cut into small dice

3 eggs
oil

Bring pots of water to the boil for the corn and potatoes. Add the corn, after it returns to the boil, cook for another half minute–corn cooks extremely quickly. Add the potatoes to the other pot, cook for about 5 minutes until the potatoes just start to get tender and cooked. Check frequently, you do not want to have potatoes overcooked and mushy.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the sausage, corn, and potatoes into the eggs and pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.