Category Archives: Frittatas

Pepperoni and artichoke frittata

Pepperoni and artichoke frittata

I love artichokes. And I find they really pair well with other foods with robust flavors such as sun-dried tomatoes in this frittata and salad or in the antipasto salad. In this frittata, the artichokes are coupled with pepperoni. Add some Italian cheeses and it makes a very tasty frittata.

A couple of notes on preparation: Pepperoni slices have a tendency to stick together and form clumps. I find it best to add these to the eggs first, a few at a time, to get them mixed in with minimum clumping. Also, I add the artichokes last to minimize stirring the eggs with them and breaking them up. I use around a half of a standard-size can of artichoke hearts. They can vary in size. Smaller ones I cut into quarters, larger ones into fifths. The way I cut into (approximate) fifths is to first cut the artichoke in half off-center. Then cut the smaller piece in half and the larger one into thirds.

Pepperoni and artichoke frittata

1/2 cup pepperoni slices cut in half
4–5 artichoke hearts cut into quarters or fifths (1/2 standard size can)
1/4 cup shredded mozzarella plus more for the top
1/4 cup grated Parmesan plus more for the top

3 eggs
olive oil

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the pepperoni, cheese, and artichokes into the eggs. Pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, sprinkle on additional cheese and place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Corn succotash frittata

Corn succotash frittata

First, about the name. I had always understood that succotash was a mixture of corn and lima beans (and dictionaries do too). So when I encountered “corn succotash” describing an accompaniment to an entree on a restaurant menu, my first thought was that this seemed redundant. Succotash includes corn, so why do you need to call a dish corn succotash? When it arrived, another surprise: The corn succotash did not include any lima beans or other shell beans that are sometimes substituted. It did include the corn, of course, along with bacon, spinach, and feta cheese, among other things. It was delicious and served as the inspiration for this frittata. But what about having succotash without the lima beans? I googled for corn succotash recipes and found a variety of dishes, many without beans of any kind, that were described as corn succotash. It seems that this term is used for mixtures of corn with ingredients other than lima beans, with the adjective “corn” added to the succotash to distinguish it from “corn and lima bean” succotash. I still think this is a strange name. But since it is common, I’ll use it here.

As I mentioned, the corn succotash was very tasty. I attempted to recreate it, making it an entree by adding chicken. It came out well, and I’ve made it several times. It occurred to me that the same ingredients, less the chicken, could be included to make a corn succotash frittata. And it was delicious!

Corn succotash frittata

2 strips of bacon, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch pieces
1–1/2 tablespoons chopped onion
3 tablespoons diced red bell pepper
1 small clove garlic, minced
3/4 cup frozen corn, thawed
3/4 cup spinach, chopped
2 tablespoons feta cheese plus more for the top

3 eggs
oil, if needed

Cook the bacon in skillet until crisp. Remove and drain on a paper towel.

Cook the onion and red pepper over medium heat in bacon fat until they start to soften. Add the garlic and cook one more minute. Add the corn and cook for 2 to 3 minutes to cook the corn and combine the flavors. Add the spinach and cook until the spinach is wilted.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan if needed and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the corn mixture, the bacon, and the feta cheese into the eggs. Pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, sprinkle on additional feta cheese and place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Croque Monsieur frittata

Croque Monsieur (or Madame?) frittata

Croque Monsieur is a French bistro classic. This is a sandwich made with ham and cheese (often Gruyere) that is topped with Béchamel sauce. I have already made a ham and Gruyere frittata, so I thought why not top it with some Béchamel sauce to make a Croque Monsiuer frittata? It may seem unusual to top a frittata with the sauce. But after all, how unusual is it to top a sandwich with the sauce?

A note about my ambiguity regarding the name. A variant of the Croque Monsieur has a fried egg added on top. This is called a Croque Madame. This frittata doesn’t have a fried egg, but given this is a frittata, the ham and cheese are inside of the egg. So maybe it should be called a Croque Madame frittata. I’ll leave the choice up to you.

Croque Monsieur (or Madame?) frittata

1 tablespoon flour
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup hot milk
2 tablespoons grated Gruyere cheese
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
dash of white pepper
dash of nutmeg

3/4 cup ham cut into small pieces
1/2 cup grated Gruyere cheese

3 eggs
oil

grated Gruyere cheese to sprinkle on top

I make the Béchamel sauce first because I don’t seem to have quite enough time while the frittata is cooking on the stove. If you’re quicker, you could do it after you start cooking the frittata. But the finished sauce holds fine while the frittata is cooking.

To make Béchamel sauce, put the butter and flour in a small saucepan over fairly low heat. Stir the flour in as the butter melts and continue to cook and stir for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and add the hot milk, whisking everything together. Place back on the stove, raise the heat to get the sauce bubbling, and cook to thicken, continuing to stir with the whisk or a wooden spoon. This will take about a minute or so. Add the cheese, mustard, pepper, and nutmeg. Continue heating and stirring for a minute to get the cheese melted and mixed through.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of egg mixture to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the ham and Gruyere cheese into the eggs and pour the mixture into the pan. (It will help to add the ham a few pieces at a time, as the pieces can stick together.) Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, spoon the (thick) Béchamel sauce over the top of the frittata. You want to distribute the sauce over the top, but there is no need to spread the spoonfuls of sauce out to make sure the entire top is covered. As the sauce heats under the broiler, it will soften and spread out evenly by itself. Sprinkle on the additional Gruyere. Place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Zucchini and tomato frittata

Zucchini and tomato frittata

This is an attractive frittata. But the tomatoes weren’t put on the top for appearance. It was done for flavor. Let me explain.

I started out wanting to make a frittata with zucchini. Zucchini is a mild vegetable, so I needed something to complement it. Tomatoes seemed the obvious choice–think ratatouille. But I though if I cut up the tomatoes and mixed them in the frittata, they would overwhelm the zucchini. Also, given the nature of a frittata, only so much can be mixed in, so including the tomatoes would reduce the amount of zucchini, further limiting the zucchini flavor. That’s when I had the idea of slicing the tomatoes thinly and using them to cover the top. The zucchini could be the star in the body of the frittata, to be complemented by the tomatoes on the top.

If you’ve looked at any of my other frittata recipies, you have seen that I like to finish the cooking of the frittata under the broiler. I made an exception for this one, baking it in the oven instead, because I didn’t want to brown the tomatoes.

Zucchini and tomato frittata

1 cup zucchini cut into matchsticks, about 3/16-inch (1 good-sized zucchini)
1 tablespoon shallot, chopped
olive oil
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated or finely shredded
2–3 Roma tomatoes, sliced very thin, enough to cover the frittata
salt
fresh ground pepper

3 eggs

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

Cook the shallot in olive oil about 2 minutes over low heat until it starts to get soft. Add the zucchini and a bit of salt and pepper. Cook for another 2 to 3 minutes until the zucchini just starts to soften. Don’t overcook, and remember that it will cook some more in the frittata.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. If needed, add a bit more oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of egg mixture to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the zucchini and shallots and the Parmesan into the eggs and pour the mixture into the pan. Place the tomato slices on top, covering the frittata. Sprinkle a little more salt and pepper on the tomatoes. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Put the frittata in the oven. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, until the egg next to the tomatoes just starts to brown.

Remove from the oven, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Greek frittata

Greek frittata

The feta cheese and Kalamata olives make this a Greek frittata.

This is a recipe where you can vary the flavor profile by varying the amounts of the ingredients. Add more feta cheese to make that more dominant. Or reduce the number of Kalamata olives to lower their presence in the frittata. (I would recommend these directions for making modifications.)

Greek frittata

1 cup coarsely chopped spinach
1/4 cup feta cheese plus more for the top
8 Kalamata olives, cut into quarters lengthwise

3 eggs
olive oil

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the spinach, cheese, and olives into the eggs. Pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, sprinkle on additional feta cheese and place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Cauliflower and cheddar frittata

Cauliflower and cheddar frittata

It is quite common to see cauliflower served with a cheese sauce. So a cauliflower and cheese frittata was an obvious choice. This is, of course, very similar to the broccoli and cheddar frittata made earlier.

A few comments: Remember to make the cauliflower pieces sufficiently small to work in the frittata. The 2 minutes of cooking seems to be about right–you want the cauliflower cooked but still firm. Finally, I included more cheese in this than in my other frittatas with cheese. I wanted this one to be really cheesy.

Cauliflower and cheddar frittata

1 heaping cup small cauliflower florets, 3/4-inch or less
1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese plus a little more for the top

3 eggs
oil

Drop cauliflower florets in boiling water. Cook for 2 minutes. Drain.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of egg mixture to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the cauliflower and cheddar into the eggs and pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, sprinkle on some additional cheese and place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Chicken fajita frittata

Chicken fajita frittata

The ingredients in a fajita will work perfectly well in a frittata. Season and cook as if making a fajita and you have a fajita frittata.

A few notes: The meat and vegetables in a fajita are traditionally made and served in strips. For a frittata, I think it makes sense to cut these strips into shorter pieces. For the bell peppers, I would choose to use red and yellow peppers in a fajita for maximum contrast. (Green pepper would not be my choice for a fajita.) But for the frittata, with the eggs being yellow, I chose an orange pepper to have contrast with the eggs. And of course the frittata ingredients can be prepared however you like to make fajitas. The chicken is often marinaded, and everyone seems to use a slightly different mixture of spices.

Chicken fajita frittata

4 ounces, 1/2 cup chicken breast, cut into strips and then shorter pieces
1/3 cup red bell pepper cut into strips and then into shorter pieces
1/3 cup orange or yellow bell pepper cut into strips and then into shorter pieces
1/3 cup red or yellow onion, sliced and cut into pieces
1/4 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/8 teaspoon paprika
1/8 teaspoon oregano
fresh ground pepper
oil

3 eggs
oil

Mix the spices. Heat oil in a pan over moderately high heat. Add the chicken and sprinkle on over half of the spice mixture. Cook, turning frequently until chicken is browned and cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. (These are small pieces, so they will cook quickly.) Remove the chicken from the pan and add the vegetables and a bit more oil if needed. Sprinkle on the remaining spice mixture. Turn down the heat to medium and cook until the vegetables are soft, 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from pan. Depending on the amount of the spices remaining in the pan, you may want to wipe it out before proceeding with the frittata.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the chicken and vegetables into the eggs. Pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate. Serve with pico de gallo or salsa.