Category Archives: Frittatas

Red bean frittata

Red beans frittata

I really liked the red beans I made with the New Orleans tostada. These were the spicy New Orleans/Louisiana/southern-style beans for red beans and rice. So I wondered how they would work in a frittata. Bottom line–great!

The beans are made the same as before. Again, I am making the whole can even though I am using only about half in the frittata. I’ll eat the rest for lunch the next day. It helps to cook the beans for a long time. I did 40 or 45 minutes this time.

In making the frittata, it didn’t seem to make sense to try to mix the beans with the eggs. So I put a thin layer of the eggs in the pan and cooked them for a minute, put the beans on top, and poured the rest of the eggs over the beans.

Red beans frittata

1 can kidney beans, drained and rinsed
1 andouille sausage, chopped up
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup green pepper, diced
1 or 2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
chicken broth
fresh ground pepper
olive oil

3 eggs
oil

Brown the sausage briefly in the olive oil. Add the onions and green pepper and cook over medium heat until soft, adding the garlic for the last minute. Add the kidney beans, cayenne pepper, fresh ground pepper and about 1/2 cup chicken broth. Cook at a low simmer for at least half an hour, stirring occasionally and adding more chicken broth as needed to keep it from getting dry.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to a pan and let it get hot. Add a thin layer of the eggs to the pan. Turn the heat down to medium low and let it cook for a minute. Spoon the beans over the top of the eggs. Spoon or pour the remainder of the eggs over the beans. Cook this for about 4 more minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Advertisements
Bacon, avocado, and tomato frittata

Bacon, avocado, and tomato frittata

This is a great sandwich combo. So why not a frittata?

I usually use a Roma tomato for a frittata. It’s about the right size. I cut it into quarter-inch slices and then cut those into small cubes just right for the frittata.

Bacon, avocado, and tomato frittata

4 slices bacon, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
1/2–3/4 avocado, small pieces
1/2 cup tomato, small cubes

3 eggs
oil

Cook the bacon until crisp. Remove and drain on a paper towel. Wipe out the pan.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the bacon, avocado, and tomato into the eggs. Pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Green and red pepper and bacon frittata

Green pepper, roasted red pepper, and bacon frittata

This frittata was conceived as a juxtaposition of textures and flavors. The softness of the roasted red pepper contrasts with the crunchiness of the green bell pepper while the crisp bacon adds another aspect. Likewise, the mild red pepper, the stronger green pepper, and the smoky bacon offer very different flavors.

A note on the preparation. I briefly cooked the green pepper in the bacon fat for just 30 seconds. The idea was not to actually cook the pepper–I didn’t want to lose the crispness and dark green color. Instead, the purpose was to just take the edge off the grassy, mildly bitter flavor of green bell peppers. I think this worked.

Green pepper, roasted red pepper, and bacon frittata

4 slices bacon, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch pieces
1/3 cup green bell pepper, sliced and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1/3 cup roasted red pepper, sliced and cut into 1/2-inch pieces

3 eggs
vegetable oil

Cook the bacon until crisp. Remove from the pan and drain on a papper towel.

Keeping the bacon fat in the pan, while still hot, add the green bell pepper pieces and cook for just 30 seconds and remove from the pan.

Pour out the bacon fat and wipe out the pan. Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the peppers and bacon into the eggs. Pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

New Orleans frittata

New Orleans frittata

The New Orleans tostada got me thinking about making a New Orleans frittata. (It was also the case that I had some of the andouille sausage left in the freezer from making the tostada.) In making the tostada, I couldn’t make up my mind and ended up topping the tostada with both andouille sausage and cajun shrimp. This worked because I could put the sausage on one tortilla and the shrimp on the other. But I didn’t think combining the sausage and shrimp in a frittata made sense. So I decided to go with just the sausage. (I’ll be making a cajun shrimp frittata sometime in the future to make up for not including the shrimp here.)

Then as far as other ingredients for the frittata, the red beans for the tostada included onion, green pepper, and garlic. These sounded good for the frittata as well. And some cayenne pepper.

New Orleans frittata

1 to 1–1/2 andouille sausages sliced in half lengthwise and then sliced, 3/4 to 1 cup
1/4 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup diced green pepper
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon (or more) cayenne pepper
olive oil

3 eggs
olive oil

Brown the sausage in olive oil. Add onions, green pepper, and cayenne pepper, reduce heat and cook until softened, adding garlic for the last minute. Remove from pan.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan if needed and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the sausage, onions, and pepper into the eggs and pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Bacon and leek frittata

Bacon and leek frittata

This is quite literally another frittata made from what I happened to have in the refrigerator. I hadn’t planned on making a frittata this week. So I hadn’t decided on any recipe and hadn’t picked up ingredients when I did my weekly shopping. And then I really felt like having a frittata.

I had a leek that was left over from something I had made the week before. (Leeks at Trader Joe’s come two to a package.) Then I remembered I had bacon in the freezer. That would work. And I had part of a red bell pepper which would go well with that and add color.

A note on the becon: Some of the things I make include bacon. But generally not more than 3 or 4 slices. And becon comes in much larger packages. Fortunately bacon freezes perfectly. So when I buy a package of bacon for something, I take the remaining bacon, separate it into groups of 3 or 4 slices, cut them in half so they fit into small plastic sandwich bags, and toss those bags into the freezer. Then when I want bacon for something I’m making, I just take a bag out and let it defrost. This was how I got the bacon for the salade Lyonnaise, for example.

Bacon and leek frittata

4 slices bacon, sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
1 leek, primarily white part, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
1/4 cup diced red bell pepper

3 eggs

Cook the bacon in a pan until the desired degree of crispness. Remove from the pan and drain on a paper towel, leaving the beacon fat in the pan.

Put the leek and pepper in the pan. Cook on medium heat until the leek and pepper are softened. Remove from the pan.

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Make sure the bacon fat in the pan is hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the bacon, leek, and pepper into the eggs. Pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

Beef and cheddar frittata

Beef and cheddar frittata

I first made this frittata because I had the ingredients in the refrigerator. I thought it turned out to be a surprisingly good combination. This is now one of my regulars.

I used 3 slices of deli roast beef, cut into small pieces. It measured out at 3/4 of a cup. As I was adding it to the eggs and cheese, not quite all of it “fit.” So I left some out. Another thing, if you have leftover roast beef, you could certainly use that as well.

Beef and cheddar frittata

1/2–3/4 cup sliced deli roast beef, in bite-sized pieces
3/4 c shredded sharp cheddar

3 eggs
oil

Put the eggs into a good-sized mixing bowl and beat just to mix them up. Add a bit of oil to the pan and let it get hot. Add a small amount of the eggs to the pan to set the bottom of the frittata to prevent sticking. Turn the heat down to medium low. Mix the cheddar cheese and beef into the eggs, adding the beef a bit at a time to keep it all from sticking together. Pour the mixture into the pan. Cook this for about 5 minutes to set the bottom and sides.

Preheat the broiler. When the 5 minutes cooking on the stove are up, place the pan under the broiler, about 6 to 7 inches below. Cook until the top is set and just starts to brown. This is about 1–1/2 to 2 minutes for me, but watch closely.

Remove from the broiler, loosen up the sides with a spatula if necessary, and slide the frittata out onto the serving plate.

The making of a frittata

After making the palak paneer frittata, I realized that this provided a typical example of how I come up with my salad and frittata recipes. First, on coming up with the basic idea: I was shopping at a new store, just looking around, and saw that they had paneer, the Indian cheese, which is not available in many stores. This made me think of palak paneer, one of my favorite Indian dishes. And that make me think, spinach and cheese are both ingredients that work well in a frittata. So why not a palak paneer frittata?

Next come the details of the ingredients and how to make it. To give it an Indian flavor, some spices should be added. Garam masala was an obvious one. My next step, which I often do, was a Google search for recipes, in this case, for palak paneer. I’m not doing this with the intent of following any specific recipe. The objective is to get ideas for potential ingredients and their quantities. This led to my adding the cumin seeds, onion, ground ginger, and garlic. A lot of the recipes also included chiles or chile pepper, but I didn’t want to include that.

Then on the preparation: Heating the cumin seeds until they sputtered was mentioned in the recipes, and I knew about that from other Indian food I have made. Of course the onion and garlic would have to be cooked. For palak paneer the spinach is completely cooked and pureed. But for me, spinach that has just been wilted works well in a frittata. Finally, briefly frying the cubes of paneer came from several of the recipes.

One thing I nearly always do when making a new preparation is to plan all of the quantitites first and measure things out during the preparation. I record this information along with the basic procedure followed for the preparation. Of course I need this for salad and frittata recipes for this blog. But I began doing this years before starting the blog for all sorts of food that I would cook. If I make something and conclude that the results are great, I want to have the information to be able to make it the same way again. Sometimes I will make something and conclude that it’s good but that it could be improved if I used more or less of some ingredients or changed the preparation in some way, perhaps cooking a longer or shorter time. So I note that on the recipe as well so I can make the change the next time. Of course I can only add more or less than I used the first time if I have a record of how much that was.

If you like to make up new recipes, I would encourage you keep such a record. It helps when making something again, and doing so provides a sense of accomplishment. I keep all my recipes, including those created by others, along with early ideas for new recipes, in the Notes program that comes on the iPhone, iPad, and Mac (and syncs among the devices). It’s handy to have my iPhone or iPad in the kitchen to refer to a recipe as I am cooking. But any app that that provides for the creation and storage of separate notes or a dedicated recipe app could be used.